Pretty Garden Paths (Plan One Now)

Still digging your way out of the latest snowstorm (like this one)? Don't worry - before you know it, you'll be walking a steadily greening garden (and planting up a storm of your own). If you REALLY want to make the walk worthwhile, put in a lovely garden path. It's easier than you think, and there are loads of amazing ideas out there, so get planning now for a pretty garden path just a few weeks from now.

Here are some GREAT ideas we dug up just for you!

Tree Trunk Pathway

This just looks SO cool, and it uses materials you may already have near you. We're all for upcycling and making the most of natural resources in a non-exploitative way, so for you naturalists out there (or simply for those who want a truly unique look), give this one a try.

Barefoot Sensory Path

This idea comes direct from an educator, and it looks like a great experience for students of all ages (including grown-up ones!). It also has an absolutely delightful look, with nature and whimsy all rolled into one. You can take this in so many directions using so many different materials and patterns.

Gorgeous Tree

Instructions aren't given for this one, but it looks easy to follow the basic pattern using stones and stone chips to recreate the look. Impressive, and just look at how cool it is with the actual fallen leaves lying along the way.

"Growing"  Bricks

Most gardens grow plants. This one "grows"  bricks! The bricks "emerging" from the grass are a really fascinating opposite-style take on a traditional garden path. This is easy to install, and upkeep should be easy as well, though you'll need to mow/cut back fairly frequently to keep the look sharp.

Herringbone Walkway

This is a very traditional look, which looks harder than it actually is to put in. Really, you're just creating the herringbone pattern with bricks. But don't let its simplicity deceive you - it's impressive, and the interlocking style means it's very solid under your feet, or under a rolling cart or other assisted device so that anybody can come along for the walk (or ride). Such a great idea.

Child's Hopscotch Path

Despite what we've named it, you don't have to be a child to appreciate the whimsy of this path. You can get creative with this look, as almost anything that doesn't entirely hide the slates/stones and the numbers will work well for the surrounding ground cover. So sweet!




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